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ICYMI – In Afghanistan and Brazil, decades-long battles come to a close

US Army Major General Chris Donahue was the last American soldier to leave Afghanistan when he boarded a transport plane yesterday, symbolizing the end to a 20-year-conflict against the Taliban. This came only days after Kabul airport, crowded by thousands of civilians trying to flee the country, was struck by two explosions. ISIS-K, an affiliate of militants who previously battled U.S. forces in Syria and Iraq, said it had carried out the attack, which killed dozens of people.

Another decades-long battle wages on in Brazil, as the Xokleng people pray that a top court in Brasilia will fulfill a dying shaman’s prophecy that they would one day win their lands back. The community was cleared off their traditional hunting grounds over a century to make room for European settlers, a time when the killing of indigenous people was rewarded by the state. The Xokleng pray that an upcoming Supreme Court ruling will restore the territory they lost all those years ago.

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